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Mountain Monday Feature: Mount Massive

As with any true competitor, Mount Massive truly embraces the idea that second place is the first loser. Because of this, fans of the mountain would take it upon themselves to stack stones on top of Massive’s peak in order to edge out its 14er neighbor, Mount Elbert. Naturally, fans of Elbert would combat this tactic by knocking down the not-so-natural mountain enhancement. 

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Mountain Monday Feature: Mount Blackburn

Happy Monday! It’s time for everyone’s favorite part of their favorite day, Mountian Monday! This week’s story is about Mount Blackburn, the tallest summit of the Wrangell Mountains in Alaska. This is also the fifth highest peak int he US and the 12th highest in all of North America. Mount Blackburn is actually an old, eroded shield volcano, the tallest of its type outside of Mount Bona. Mount Blackburn boasts a staggering elevation of 16,390 feet, making Pike’s Peak look like a warmup.  The mountain is covered in ice fields and glaciers, making the climb exceptionally difficult. The mountain was first successfully climbed in 1958 by 5 climbers, most notable Hans Gmoser. When Gmoser originally climbed the mountain, he was...

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Mountain Monday Feature: Pike’s Peak

Happy Monday! Hope you all had a great weekend! It’s time for another special feature of Mountain Monday!  Today’s special feature is on what is often referred to as “America’s Mountain,” Pikes Peak. This mountain is named after Zebulon Pike, who never actually was able to reach the summit of this monster. Pike’s Peak is the tallest mountian in the Front Range, and is the highest point of anything East of its location. 

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Mountain Monday Feature - Mount Whitney

Happy Monday! I hope you all had a great weekend! This week’s Mountian Monday Feature goes out to the tallest mountain in California, and the tallest in the Contiguous United States, Mount Whitney. This brute’s base starts at just 282 feet above sea level and tops out at 14,505 feet. 

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